Real Food Whole Life

Season 4

100 Want to Make Good Habits Stick? Here’s How with Gretchen Rubin

Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

Do you want to make good habits really stick?

Want to make good habits stick? Here's how, with Gretchen Rubin on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #personality #habits #routine

Want to Make Good Habits Stick? Here’s How with Gretchen Rubin

For habits that stick, we're going to one of the experts, Gretchen Rubin, who happens to be one of the most influential writers on the subjects of habits, happiness, and human nature.

This is part three of our summer masterclass five tiny habits that will change your life.

Listen now!

Shownotes

Do you want to make good habits really stick?

This is part three of our summer masterclass five tiny habits that will change your life.

Make sure to grab the cheatsheet so you can follow along.

For habits that stick, we're going to one of the experts, Gretchen Rubin, who happens to be one of the most influential writers on the subjects of habits, happiness, and human nature.

On how she left a successful law career for writing:

Gretchen became seized with an idea one day, while working for Justice O'Connor looking at the Capitol dome against the blue sky, wondering, "what am I interested in that everyone in the world is interested in?"

She became interested and started doing research on it, soon realizing that it was at the level of research people who write books do, and that people write books for a living.

And she realized, "I would rather fail as a writer than succeed as a lawyer, so I need to try".

So she started her new adventure, writing about human nature.

It took Gretchen 10 years to become an overnight success-- her bestseller, The Happiness Project, is actually her fifth book.

Her earlier books didn't receive as much public attention, but the ones following The Happiness Project continued to receive attention at a much larger scale.

And she loved writing all of them.

"Enjoy the process for what it is".

On the origin of The Happiness Project:

Gretchen got her idea for The Happiness Project while sitting on a bus on a rainy day during a moment for reflection. 

She thought, "what do I want from life, anyway?" and realized that she wanted to be happy, something she just never thought about.

So she thought, "I should have a happiness project".

It was such a rich, vast subject that got her excited for all the things she wanted to do, including making it her next book project.

In setting up The Happiness Project, Gretchen considered what the ordinary person could control, on an ordinary day, as part of regular life.

It's about what you can actually control and actually do; the very practical things you can do to make yourself happier, healthier, more productive, and more creative.

On what it means to “Be Gretchen”: 

You, of course, have to substitute your own name.

"The only way we can build a happy, creative, healthy, efficient life is on the foundation of our own nature, our own values, our own interests, our own temperament. There is no magic one-size-fits-all solution".

Quote from Gretchen Rubin on the Feel Good Effect podcast on building a happy, healthy life. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #purpose

As people, we are mostly alike, but our differences are so important.

If you look at health interventions and diet programs, there is an underlying assumption that there is one right way or best way to do something. 

But it doesn't work for everyone.

Sometimes things work, sometimes they don’t, and it’s not your fault.

On why it’s so hard to know yourself:

There’s the way we wish we were, the way other people wish we were, and our assumptions about what people are like.

Gretchen tries to come up with laws of distinctions and vocabulary to describe how people may differ from each other:

  • Are you a morning person or a night person?

  • Are you a finisher or an opener?

  • Are you a simplicity lover or an abundance lover?

  • What did you do for fun when you were 10-years old?

  • Whom do you envy?

  • What do you lie about?

Accepting what you actually dislike opens up a whole new world of possibilities and alternatives.

If you're just beating yourself up, you're not going to move forward because you haven't acknowledged that you need to find a different solution.

On The Four Tendencies:

The Four Tendencies is a framework that divides people into four categories: Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, and Rebels.

It has to do with how you respond to expectations.

We experience two types of expectations: 

1 | Outer expectations: like a work deadline or request from a friend.

2 | Inner expectations: like your own desire to keep a resolution or eat healthier.

Check out the quiz: The Four Tendencies Quiz

  • Upholders readily meet inner and outer expectations: what's expected from others of them is important as are their expectations from themselves.

  • Questioners question all expectations: they'll do something if they think it makes sense, they don't like anything arbitrary or inefficient or unjustified. 

  • Obligers readily meet outer expectations but they struggle to meet inner expectations.

  • Rebels resist all expectations alike: they want to do their own thing on their own time.

When you know your tendency, you can set things up in a way that's more likely to help you get where you're going.

On the challenges and positives of each tendency:

  • Upholders are often judgmental of other people, puzzled and frustrated by others’ inability to follow through. They often have expectations that, for others, are unrealistic or need support.

  • Obligers are the rocks of the world, they're leaders, great teammates, and great family members because they really come through for other people. The limitations of an obliger often falls onto themselves, "I keep my promises to other people, why can't I keep my promises to myself?"

    • Solution: give yourself outer accountability. 

    • Obligers have a very common pattern of "obliger rebellion": they will meet, meet, meet expectations, and then they snap when they feel neglected or exploited.

    • "It doesn't matter what I should be able to do, it's only what I can do and what I will do".

  • Questioners are very focused on what's efficient and what makes sense, but where people have trouble is when they suffer from "analysis paralysis": they want more and more information to a point that is frustrating for others. And they often don't like being questioned themselves.

  • Rebels are very different from the other tendencies. The hacks and tips that work for other tendencies often don't work for them. For rebels, it comes down to choice and freedom.

Quote from Gretchen Rubin on the Feel Good Effect podcast on being authentic with yourself. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #purpose

On why September is the new January:

We spend so much time in the school calendar, so for a lot of people, as much as January is a fresh start, September is a time for a clean pad of paper and freshly sharpened pencils.

"There's something about beginnings that has extra power… It's always the right time to begin, you don't need to wait"

It's good to have opportunities for reflection, what would I do differently?

Quote from Gretchen Rubin on the Feel Good Effect podcast on starting your goals. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #motivation

On one little thing:

1 | Figure out what tendency you are.

Take the quiz here:  The Four Tendencies Quiz

2 | Pick one thing to do to leverage that tendency.

"How can I leverage this tendency to make it easier?"

 Use #teamtinychanges on social

Guest Bio

Gretchen Rubin is the author of several books, including the block- buster New York Times bestsellers, Better Than Before, The Happiness Project and Happier at Home. She has an enormous readership, both in print and online, and her books have sold more than three million copies worldwide, in more than thirty languages. She makes frequent TV appearances and is in much demand as a speaker. On her weekly podcast Happier with Gretchen Rubin, she discusses good habits and happiness with her sister Elizabeth Craft. Rubin started her career in law and was clerking for Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor when she realized she wanted to be a writer. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters.

Resources

The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin

Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin

The Happier Podcast with Gretchen Rubin

Happier in Hollywood podcast

Take the Four Tendency quiz!

3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love

81 inner order, outer calm & decluttering, with Gretchen Rubin

Paring Down to Create More, with Melissa Coleman

How to Get Unstuck and Simplify, with Ashley Gartland

SHOW THE FEEL GOOD EFFECT LOVE

  1. Share it via FacebookInstagramPinterest, or Twitter

  2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

  3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

This post contains affiliate links.

99 Want to Find What You’re Passionate About? Here’s How with Karen Walrond

Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

Do you want to discover what you're really passionate about?

Want to discover what you're really passionate about? Here's how, with Karen Walond on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #purpose

Want to Find What You’re Passionate About? Here’s How with Karen Walrond

This conversation with Karen Walrond, we're talking about how to find out what you're passionate about. Karen gives us a beautiful definition of finding your superpower and passion with a very tactical step by step exercises to help you really hone in.

This is part two in our 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life Summer Masterclass.

Listen now!

Shownotes

Do you want to discover what you're passionate about?

I mean, really, know exactly what you're passionate about?

This is part two in our 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life Summer Masterclass.

Make sure you grab the Summer Masterclass freebie so you can follow along.

In today's episode, we're talking about how to find out what you're passionate about.

This conversation with Karen Walrond, she gives us a beautiful definition of finding your superpower and passion with a very tactical step by step exercises to help you really hone in.

On what she does:

Karen is a leadership consultant, who helps people provide purpose in their work by identifying gifts and values to integrate into work-life and life-life.

Started out by doing what she was supposed to be doing, earning degrees in engineering and law.

“I was doing what I was supposed to do rather than what I was called to do… I decided that this couldn’t work”

Although she was successful and respected in her work, she wanted something different, and ended up leaving her law position without a set plan.

In search for the next step, she discusses how she had to dig deep, asking…

  1. What is it that I love to do?

  2. What are the things that bring me joy?

  3. What are the things that when I achieve them, I get a real sense of purpose?

  4. What are my values?

On making the decision to leave:

After catching a client in an ethical dilemma, Karen realized the effect of her values mixed with her work responsibilities affected her well-being negatively.

She had been blogging for 5 years, and knew photography, writing, and public speaking were her biggest strengths and passions.

Using her site as portfolio of what she could do, Karen found practice in speaking, writing, and shooting.

Through this process, she valued and found importance in…

  1. Being patient

  2. Being open to opportunities

  3. “Being loud about the things that were important to me”

Quote from Karen Walrond about passion on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #purpose

The hardest part about the transition of trading her old life for one of uncertainty was not loss of income, but loss of identity.

She felt like with her identity as a woman of color and values, she was letting down the people who needed her to stay.

“Mine your past for what it has given you thus far, and see how you can use that into the future; I don’t think anything is wasted”

After leaving her job, Karen sat down and made a list of everything she loves to do, both related to work and life.

She remembers reviewing her list, point by point, asking, “why do I love these things?”, to find clues as to what’s there for her and where they might take her.

She also made a list of passions, including both passions of love and passions of anger, asking further, “where can these take me?”.

On creativity and vulnerability:

“It’s easier to endure vulnerability, than comparison”

Quote from Karen Walrond about comparison on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #purpose

Vulnerability: risk coupled with emotional exposure

Comparison: comparing your insides with somebody’s outsides

“Comparison will kill creativity… there is room in this world for all of us to do our art form… nobody does it with your voice, nobody does it with your experience, nobody does it with your insight.”

Keep falling forward.

Quote from Karen Walrond about creativity on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #purpose

On finding your superpower:

What makes us different makes us beautiful, from Karen’s book, The Beauty of Different: Observations of a Confident Misfit

We tend to be uncomfortable with standing out, yet we are captivated by the people who do.

Find purpose in your life with the things that make you different: these are your superpowers.

You cannot get farther without diversity of thought and diversity of experience.

Fitting in vs. Belonging, from Brené Brown’s, Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

Fitting in- forces you to fit a standard that holds you back

Belonging- understanding your self-worth and value, everyone else is worthy

On overnight success:

Yes, some people may become an overnight success.

But not a transformative success.

Hard work and practice at something purposeful will bring transformative success, although much of the behind-the-scenes may not be seen.

On leveling-up versus meeting expectations:

Something new takes time to get comfortable and routine with, but at some point we can get too comfortable and stop moving forward (or leveling-up).

Sometimes comfort is good, and leveling-up isn’t necessary.

Other times, in areas you feel like you just need more- don’t get comfortable.

Use that to progress.

On what it means to be healthy:

“I think being healthy is the same as being mindful and self-reflective… Being able to check in with yourself and give yourself a certain amount of grace and kindness”.

Karen’s morning intentions

  1. What can I do to feel healthy today?

  2. What can I do to feel purposeful today?

  3. What can I do to feel connected today?

Tiny change: journaling and figuring out what you really love, what you enjoy doing, what makes you curious.

1 | Get a piece of paper and draw a line down the middle.

2 | On the left side, start a freeform brain dump on anything that you enjoy doing.

  • Don't censor yourself and don't overthink it

  • Think about all the tiny details

  • Ask the people in your life what they think of when they think of you

  • Mining your past and mining your present.

As a kid what did you love doin gin your free time? as an adolescent, where did you spend your time? part of clubs/outside/around people/alone? 

What are you reading/listening to/watching now?

3 | On the right side, jot down quick thoughts about why.

  • What is it about those clubs you were part of or the things you're reading that you like? why are your drawn to it?

  • Look for a circle themes

4 | Write your three things and find ways to incorporate those themes into your life.

 Use #teamtinychanges on social.

Guest Bio

Karen Walrond, is a consultant and coach, with a focus on building meaningful business and leadership skills to change the world.

Using empirical, research-based principles of courage, vulnerability, authenticity and positive psychology, she helps executives, professionals & entrepreneurs infuse purpose in their lives and businesses.  

She’s a sought-after keynote and TEDx speaker, and has spoken around the United States and abroad to individuals and organizations on the topic of thriving, through leadership development, the magic of creativity, the valuing of cultural and racial diversity and inclusion, and the power of social media.  

Her bestselling book, The Beauty of Different, is a chronicle of observations that what makes us different makes us beautiful -- and may even be the source of our superpowers.

And finally, as an avid photographer and journaler, she uses creative exercises to help clients discover their own their gifts and superpowers, and how to use them in a way that allows them to thrive.

Website: chookooloonks.com

Instagram: @chookooloonks

Resources

5 Tiny Changes That Will Change Your Life free download & printable

The Beauty of Different: Observations of a Confident Misfit

Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone

3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love

How to Flip Your Goals to be Happier & Healthier Right Now

The 2 Decisions That Move Your Biggest Goals From Possible to Inevitable, with Hal Elrod

How to Step Into Your Power, with Lalah Delia

SHOW THE FEEL GOOD EFFECT LOVE

  1. Share it via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter

  2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

  3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

98 Want to Improve Your Focus? Here’s How with Leah Weiss

Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

Do you want to improve your focus to be more present in your everyday life?

We've got you covered.

Want to improve your focus? Here's how, with Dr. Leah Weiss on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #mindfulness #wellness #productivity

Want to Improve Your Focus? Here’s How with Leah Weiss

This conversation with Dr. Leah Weiss is all about what mindfulness really means, how to create mindful practices in your daily life (even for the busiest schedules), and how to be more resilient to avoid burnout. This episode is the first part of our Summer Masterclass all about tiny habits that will totally change your life.

Listen now!

Shownotes

Do you want to improve your focus to be more present in your everyday life?

We've got you covered.

This is the first part of our Summer Masterclass all about tiny habits that will totally change your life.

Today's conversation is with Dr. Leah Weiss, author of How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind, and teacher of compassionate leadership.

Be sure to grab the free cheat sheet to follow along with each of the Summer Masterclass episodes.

Each episode has one little thing you can do to make a big difference.

Mindfulness: does it sound daunting, boring, or like something you could never do?

This episode is all about what you really need to know about mindfulness and how to do it in real life.

Dr. Leah Weiss has a depth of knowledge and experience when it comes true mindfulness and she's also a mama, so she knows what it's like to live in the real world.

Leah noticed that this lofty idea of mindfulness was really not translating well into our day to day, seeming like something unattainable that takes forever.

Mindfulness has a lot of research-backed effects when it comes to wellbeing, to feeling really good, and when it comes to helping and serving those around you.

"It's not about selfishness, it's about being in your body, being able to pay attention to the moment, which helps you live your best life and helps you to contribute in so many ways".

On mindfulness beyond meditation:

Leah found that as a mama, she needed to think about mindfulness beyond meditation, the other 23+ hours in the day.

Her book really clarifies how to leverage opportunities for mindfulness outside of the meditation context.

Meditation is in the service of having a perspective or way of being in the world.

It is a great, powerful way to cultivate, to train, to get stronger, but it's always been about the world.

Leah is more interested in reorienting our relationship with mindfulness, to say "what does it really mean to be mindful", and “why are we meditating if it's not to bring this into our relationships, our workplace, and stress?

There may be some pushback around personalizing meditation or framing it to benefit us in the workplace, but it's always been a complex idea that has infused meditation into real life and work.

Mindfulness is something that fits into all lifestyles and religions, too.

On the false dichotomy:

There is a natural formulation to put things into two separate categories at odds with each other, but often there are more than two options.

What does it mean to frame things as more of a spectrum?

There is often an expectation that we are a certain way in one context and a different way in another when in actuality, we are the same person bringing experiences into each space.

Everyone is dealing with something, and we can support that in the workplace.

On mindfulness in real life:

Mindfulness: the intentional use of attention.

Want to improve your focus? Here's how, with Dr. Leah Weiss on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #mindfulness #wellness #productivity

There's not a division between meditation as it's supposed to unfold in our life in the way that these practices have been framed.

We can be aware of what we are selecting and returning our attention to, even if it's doing the dishes or folding laundry.

But in a world that our attention is being pulled in different directions, we can experience overwhelm and an inability to feel a sense of fulfillment

On self-compassion:

The three-part definition that Dr. Kristin Neff uses is helpful in remembering the what in what we're doing.

Self-compassion: mindfulness + common humanity + self-kindness / self-coaching.

  • Mindfulness in that we can be aware of our own suffering.

  • Common humanity is being part of the human condition. It’s contextualizing what we're experiencing and using it as an opportunity to narrow and isolate or see it as a bridge to better understand other people.

  • Whether we can meet our own suffering with self-kindness.

  • Self-coaching refers to the idea that we can train ourselves in how we would theoretically respond to other people with this suffering, and can we respond to ourselves in that way.

On suffering in the context of mindfulness:

Suffering in the context of mindfulness refers to any of the things that we feel stressed, pain, discomfort, anxiety, or worry about.

It’s all of the negative states of mind that we experience in a day by day, moment by moment way that can be opportunities for growth and learning but for many of us that cause pain if we don't have a way to frame them.

Strategies for mindful practice:

1 | Throughout your day, as you go through all of your activities, return your attention to your physical body to understand what's going on.

How are you breathing?

What sensations are you experiencing?

What kind of tension are you starting to hold?

This translates into the ability to better regulate emotions.

Training ourselves to get better with recognizing the relationship between the emotional experience and the physical patterns we have can allow us to start to recognize those tells ahead of time.

Tip: give yourself brief reminders throughout the day to check in and create a habit of being more aware of what's happening in both your emotional and physical self.

2 | Train yourself in emotion narration + avoid burnout.

"If you don't metabolize your emotions as you go, then you're a time bomb".

There is a connection between an inability to know what we're feeling and a predisposition to have our emotions lash out when we're under stress.

Emotion narration: know what you're feeling.

We can train ourselves with repetition throughout the day by asking, "what am I feeling, emotionally and physically?

In helping professions, from doctors to social workers to stay at home moms, burnout is real.

There is a difference between empathy and compassion in the way it shows up in our brains and bodies.

Our bodies are not meant to sustain the upregulated empathy overtime.

With compassion, what we experience in our brains is connective and rewarding.

The empathy we experience is pain, the pain we are mirroring in the other person.

Checking in with yourself throughout the day is one way to increase resilience and build compassion.

3 | Monotask well + notice how you feel.

"The biggest misnomer is this idea that we can multitask".

We cannot do more than one thing at a time, but we can task-switch (go back and forth).

Each time we switch, though, there is a cost because we have to reorient to the new task.

This isn't something we can do effectively.

An alternative: set a timer for 25 minutes, do a very focused increment of work, stand up, take a 5 minute break, rejuvenate, and then repeat.

With this incremental and focused work, productivity is higher as is a sense of enjoyment and accomplishment.

"We're all works in progress".

Want to improve your focus? Here's how, with Dr. Leah Weiss on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #mindfulness #wellness #productivity

On what it really means to be healthy:

"To live with intentionality, to live with humor, it's both. The intentionality piece and the learning and growing and developing, but also this sense of humor implies a humility of knowing ‘I'm a work in progress, we're all works in progress’".

One tiny habit:

Pick a time of day and a task, put a time limit on it, and pay attention on purpose.

This is what I like to call "micro-mindfulness".

Do this everyday that you can over the next week.

1 | Pick a task: brushing your child's hair, folding the laundry, doing the dishes, sipping a cup of tea, etc.

2 | Pick a time limit, even if it’s 2 minutes.

3 | Pay attention on purpose: How does it feel? What does it smell like? What're the sounds around you?

Use #teamtinychanges on social to show me how you’re making changes with this tiny habit.

Want to improve your focus? Here's how, with Dr. Leah Weiss on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #mindfulness #wellness #productivity

Guest Bio

Leah Weiss, Ph.D. is a researcher, lecturer, consultant, and author.

She teaches Compassionate Leadership at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where she created the perennially-waitlisted course "Leading with Mindfulness and Compassion."

She is a principal teacher and a founding faculty member of Stanford's “Compassion Cultivation Program,” conceived by the Dalai Lama.

Her first book, “How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind” (HarperWave) focuses on developing compassionate and soft skill-based leadership while also offering research-backed actionable steps towards finding purpose at work."

Website: leahweissphd.com

Instagram: @leahweissphd

Resources

Free Cheat Sheet: 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life Summer Masterclass

Grab Leah’s Book: How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind

Dr. Weiss on The Good Life Project Podcast

How to Cultivate Self-Compassion, with Dr. Kristin Neff

5 Grounding Episodes On Mindfulness

3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love!

The Secret to Staying Gentle (When Life Gets Messy)

How to Live a Resilient Life, with Dr. Rick Hanson

Meditation for the Rest of Us, with Kait Hurley

SHOW THE FEEL GOOD EFFECT LOVE

Share it via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter

 Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

97 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life (Summer Masterclass)

Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

Are you ready for 5 tiny habits that will change your life?

5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life. Summer Masterclass from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #habits #routine

5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life (Summer Masterclass)

Summer can throw us off our routines and we can often be overly-ambitious about all the things we want to accomplish before it’s back-to-school mode again. Or it can be a time to look at your life and make, tiny, effective changes.

Listen on for the 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life Challenge!

Listen now!

Shownotes

Are you ready for 5 tiny habits that will change your life?

Yeah, #teamtinychanges? We're all about it.

Summer around here is a time when we all get thrown off our routines.

I always end up being overly ambitious with everything I want to do during the summer, and then before you know it, it's full on back-to-school mode again.

But I also think that summer can be a time to look at your life and make teeny, tiny changes.

When the routine goes out the window, it's the perfect time to reevaluate.

"What little things can I tweak that might make a big difference?"

The 5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life Summer Masterclass:

This is a totally free community challenge and all you have to do is grab the free cheat sheet here and then listen to the podcast for the next five weeks!

That's all there is to it.

There's one tiny change per week featuring a curated collection of conversations that I picked from our almost 100 episodes and put together for you.

Download the Free Guide!

    A sneak peak on who you'll hear from:

    • Leah Weiss: on how to improve your focus.

    • Gretchen Rubin: on how to make good habits stick.

    • Jon Acuff: on how to finally finish what you've started.

    • Jenny Blake: on how to get better at dealing with change.

    • Karen Walrond: on how to find what you're passionate about.

    Quote from Robyn Conley Downs on making tiny habits, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #habits

    Here's a chance to listen on your own time, and take some action.

    Resources

    5 Tiny Changes That Will Change Your Life free download & printable

    3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love

    How to Stop Overthinking Meals

    How to Create a Wellness Routine (you can actually stick to)

    Unpacking Mindset: What Mindset is, What it’s Not & 5 Ways to Shift it

    Show the Feel Good Effect Love!

    1. Share it via FacebookInstagramPinterest, or Twitter

    2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

    3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

    5 Tiny Habits That Will Change Your Life. Summer Masterclass from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #habits #routine

    96 Want to Create a Natural Skincare Routine? Here's How with Bethany McDaniel

    Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

    Do you want to create a simple, beautiful, natural skincare routine?

    Or just find some simple swaps to replace those toxic ingredients on your shelf with safer alternatives?

    Create a natural, nontoxic, clean skincare routine, with Bethany McDaniel of Primally Pure. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #nontoxic #cleanbeauty #naturalbeauty

    Want to Create a Natural Skincare Routine? Here's How with Bethany McDaniel

    Are you ready to create a natural skincare routine?

    That’s exactly what we’re talking about in this conversation with Bethany McDaniel, founder of Primally Pure.

    We’ll walk you through some simple swaps and troubleshooting for when you first switch to all natural skincare products as well as Bethany’s beauty routine and favorite products

    Listen now!

    My Favorite Primally Pure Products

    I pulled together my favorite Primally Pure products, including the deodorant and Everything Spray we talked about in this episode. Check them out here, and enter ROBYN for 10% off your first purchase.

    Shownotes

    Bethany grew up dealing with a lot of skin sensitivities in a not-so-naturally-minded home.

    When she met her husband and his family, she was introduced to eating real food.

    It was appealing to her; she had always been interested in health but never really knew where to start.

    She tried a variety of diets, wanting something to cling to, but she never thought it could be something as simple as eating real food, getting enough sleep, or moving her body.

    She was intrigued, so she cleared up her diet and started taking baby steps.

    Around the same time, her husband’s family started a farm and she had begun formulating skincare products for herself and family.

    After getting encouraging feedback on her products, she started listing them on the farm website.

    It started picking up steam, and eventually it got to the point where she had to move her business to a website of her own.

    About 6 months into the business, she found out she was pregnant with her first daughter, which gave her the push to hire somebody on and move the business out of her kitchen and into a separate space.

    Now, Primally Pure is a team of 28 employees in a new, larger space.

    Bethany’s business was sparked by her interest in natural skincare.

    She dealt with different skin issues, constantly in and out of the dermatologist, on antibiotics too frequently, trying different creams and ointments, and having bad reactions to what she tried.

    She always wondered, though, if there was something she could be changing in her diet or something else other than medicine, but her dermatologist always told her no.

    The first natural product Bethany tried and loved was jojoba oil; she noticed a big difference just by swapping out whatever moisturizer she was using at the time for jojoba oil.

    And then when she met her husband and learned about the whole other side of things, which really started her journey into wellness and natural skincare.

    On flipping the script on mindset:

    Bethany tried so many things, really searching for the right diet, always wanting to be a healthy person and feel her best.

    When she was turned onto this simplified way of doing things, she started making one little switch at a time.

    Every shift encouraged her more, making it easier to keep going and wanting to learn.

    Instead of feeling overwhelmed by having done everything “wrong” her whole life, instead, she took it one step at a time and focused on making small swaps and really developing new habits slowly.

    There was just starting to be so much information out there when Bethany started this journey.

    She knew, that health and wellness were so much more simple than the world makes it out to be, but everyone has their own journey and you can’t force anyone else to change, which was the hardest part.

    There are still areas Bethany looks to improve, but it’s better to go at a pace you’re comfortable with, keep the stress down, and make it a fun transformation.

    Infuse joy and flip the script to process over goal; enjoy the learning instead of creating a sense that you need to fix everything at once.

    Quote from Robyn Conley Downs on finding joy in wellness, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #joyful #wellness #gentle
    Quote from Bethany McDaniel on slowing down with wellness, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #wellness #gentle

    “Take it one step at a time”.

    On the challenges of creating natural products:

    There are a lot of challenges that come with working with natural ingredients, but it's not even something Bethany thinks about replacing with synthetic alternatives.

    A big reason why she's able to work with natural ingredients and sell natural products is because Primally Pure is a direct to consumer brand-- they aren't available in any stores so they don't sit on a shelf waiting for someone to buy it.

    Because they are selling directly to their customers, they're able to control the amount of time between making a product and getting it into the customer's hands.

    Another factor that comes with natural ingredients is the consistency of the products.

    They're more sensitive to heat or cold compared to less natural products, so Bethany likes to make sure customers know what to expect and how to take care of their products.

    It just takes a simple mindset shift to understand what it means to have these kinds of products that come with great benefits.

    Even just since Primally Pure got started, there have been some big growth in the natural beauty industry.

    "People are just so much more warm to the idea of using natural products".

    And even though they still work to educate people about why it's important, it's not as foreign.

    On the benefits of switching to natural products:

    • In one study, 99.9% of breast cancer tumors were found to have parabens in them.

    • Deodorant is something we use every single day in such a sensitive, absorbent area.

    • Synthetic ingredients have the potential to disrupt hormones and cause toxic build up in the body.

    • It's the combination of all the toxic products used that starts to build up in the body and overtime cause problems.

    It's not about tossing all your products with chemicals in them or something terrible will happen, but it's just not good to do it with every product every day.

    Quote from Bethany McDaniel on natural, nontoxic beauty, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #naturalbeauty #cleanbeauty

    "The more natural swaps you can make, the better"

    When you think about it as a lifetime of using toxic products, for years and years, that's when the problems can happen.

    Bethany's #1 recommended switch: deodorant.

    • Fragrance is also huge, both in what we spray onto our bodies as well as fragrance in our products, like heavily scented lotions or candles.

    • One thing to note if you switch to a natural deodorant: if you switch from an antiperspirant, you're going to sweat a lot more (for a little bit) with the natural, aluminum-free deodorant.

    Concerned about reacting to the product?

    • A lot of people are sensitive to baking soda, so there may be an initial reaction to the baking soda in natural deodorants.

    • Baking soda works really well at preventing odor, though, so Bethany has worked to find a balance in her products to eliminate odor and not cause reactions for majority of people.

    Concerned about getting it on your clothes?

    • Bethany applies deodorant before getting dressed to give it some time to absorb so it doesn't transfer to clothes.

    • She only recommends using one to three swipes; it's not necessary to use more and it's more likely to get on your clothes.

    Tip: how you eat can affect how much you sweat and how much your sweat smells or doesn't smell.

    Tip: exercising frequently can allow your body to sweat out toxins so you're not getting rid of it over the course of the day.

    View it as an experiment and figure out what works for you and affects you.

    "Getting to the root of the problem as opposed to masking the symptoms"

    On Bethany's evening beauty routine:

    1 | Whenever she can, Bethany takes a bath.

    2 | She loves using Primally Pure cleaning oil: it works really well as a cleanser, but it's also just a really soothing experience that helps you wind down.

    3 | She follows up with Primally Pure Everything Spray: to use it as a toner, you can either spray it on or apply it with a cotton round.

    4 | Primally Pure is coming out with new face serums this month!

    There are three options:

    • A plumping serum for aging skin

    • A clarifying serum for acne and blemishes

    • A soothing serum for sensitive skin.

    5 | Coming soon: face masks that cater to the same skin concerns.

    As a mama, these little moments are a whole ritual and experience.

    "Motherhood allows us to appreciate those little moments of joy"

    Remind yourself that you're a priority and infuse joy into wellness.

    On being a working mama and taking care of yourself:

    Bethany is trying to be more intentional about the things she has to be a part of and the things that she doesn't.

    As an entrepreneur, it's difficult to not be involved in everything.

    But she empowers her team to make certain decisions and go about things without needing as much of her approval or guidance.

    She's thinking more about the things that she needs to be a part of and the things that she doesn't, trying to let go of the things she doesn't need to be as closely involved with.

    It gives her more mental freedom to really focus on her kinds when she's with them, instead of all the lingering tasks.

    On what it really means to be healthy:

    "I think true health is not just about physical health, it's so multifaceted, so mind body spirit, a culmination of those three things and really trying to grow in knowledge and in applying what you learn every day... always growing and keeping things well rounded".

    Create a natural, nontoxic, clean skincare routine, with Bethany McDaniel of Primally Pure. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #nontoxic #cleanbeauty #naturalbeauty

    Guest Bio

    Bethany McDaniel founded Primally Pure in 2015 out of her passion to share the natural skincare solutions she had discovered with others.

    As a teenager and young adult, Bethany struggled with acne, rosacea and various skin sensitivities. She tried a variety of creams and prescription medications, but nothing gave her lasting results. Somewhere in the midst of her skin struggles, Bethany’s family spontaneously started a beyond organic livestock farm called Primal Pastures. Her family’s journey with the farm opened her eyes to an entirely new way of living and caring for the body naturally.

    This new lifestyle inspired Bethany to switch to all-natural personal care products.  After purging her bathroom cabinets of toxic conventional skincare products, Bethany began formulating her own replacements with real, recognizable ingredients.  Much to her surprise, the products she made actually worked better than the dozens she had tried in the past.

    Bethany began selling her formulations on the Primal Pastures website and was completely surprised and overwhelmed by the positive response from customers in her Southern California community. Her home was quickly overrun with coconut oil, glass jars/bottles and shipping boxes, causing her to move the business into an office/warehouse space just a year later.

    Today, Primally Pure continues to grow at a rapid pace and Bethany remains passionate about providing customers with all-natural and non-toxic skincare products that support radiant skin, a healthy body and a happy self.

    Resources

    www.primallypure.com

    • Use code ROBYN for a 10% discount on your first Primally Pure order.

    Connect on Instagram @primallypure

    Robyn’s Primally Pure products

    3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love

    Rethinking Healthy Skin: How to Restore the Skin Biome + Glow From the Inside Out, with Jasmina Aganovic

    Why Retouching isn’t Health: Real Beauty, Redefined, with Sarah Dubbeldam

    How to Naturally Balance Your Hunger Hormones with Kelly Leveque

    SHOW THE FEEL GOOD EFFECT LOVE

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    3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

    This post contains affiliate links.

    95 Want to Stop Stressing About Food? Here's How with Elise Museles

    Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

    It’s time to stop stressing about food, and we’re going to tell you exactly how to do that.

    It’s time to stop stressing about food, and we’re going to tell you exactly how to do that with Elise Museles on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #gentle #wellness #healthy

    Want to Stop Stressing About Food? Here's How with Elise Museles

    We’re going to talk about how to tell your food story, something that’s more important and impactful than any diet or meal plan you’ve ever tried.

    Our guest today is Elise Museles, a certified eating psychology a nutrition expert, creator of the food story platform, and the wildly popular blog, Kale and Chocolate.

    This episode is jam-packed with mindset shifts, habits, and strategies so you can take action, rewrite your food story, and unlock a world where you listen to your body and choose foods that feel good to you.

    Listen now!

    Shownotes

    Our guest today is Elise Museles, a certified eating psychology a nutrition expert, creator of the food story platform, and the wildly popular blog, Kale and Chocolate.

    As an author, speaker, health coach, and podcast host, Elise’s mission is to empower women to create a healthier relationship with food and their bodies by changing what’s on their plate and what’s in their minds.

    This episode is jam-packed with mindset shifts, habits, strategies, and a game plan so there are so many ways to take action.

    On what led Elise to her interest in Food Story:

    For a while, Elise was obsessed with finding the perfect diet.

    In doing so, she read everything she could find and asked people about what kinds of diets they were following.

    The idea of food story stemmed from way back then.

    Then, when she went to the Institute of Integrative Nutrition in 2009, there was a lot of talk about the concept of bioindividuality, that we're all so different.

    Now that idea is a little more common, but back then, there were certain diets and rules that were supposed to work for everyone.

    And that really planted the seed for how we all have different food stories, which so much plays into, from the way you were brought up and the messages you received as a child to your thought patterns and your culture.

    Bioindividuality is the idea that we are all so unique, that we all have unique stories and unique metabolism.

    When Elise learned more about this idea, it really helped her release that search for the perfect diet, because there is no perfect diet.

    What works is what works for you.

    There was a relief when the search was over, but at that time Elise didn't know how to trust her intuition.

    She had no idea how to listen to her body after she had questioned everything and really silenced it.

    To find out what works for you, you have to be really connected to how you feel and how you think.

    In doing so, it set her on a path of self-discovery.

    On Food Story:

    Your food story is everything from what's on your plate to what's in your mind.

    So often we're caught up on the "whats", like what to eat and how much.

    But when you think about it as a story, there are lots of different themes and characters and it's always evolving.

    Your food story is the way that your mother talked about her body and what your father said about vegetables.

    It's the food that you eat what you're celebrating and then the food that you eat when you're heartbroken.

    It's knowing that you should be eating X and then eating Y instead.

    It's all of those things and the memories and the way that you were raised and the messages that you hear, it all comes together and it forms your unique story.

    The beauty of a food story is that it is always changing and evolving.

    Quote from Elise Museles. You are the author of your own story, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #story

    "You can always change and write a new chapter; you are the author of your story".

    It gives you permission to let all of those things that have happened, just be.

    Obviously, your relationship with food is a part of your food story, but so often we think about our relationship with food and we become defensive and it's a dead end.

    But a story has more flow, and that's why Elise uses the term "food story" instead of talking about a "relationship with food".

    When Robyn was in her doctoral program, she was right at the stage of writing her dissertation before she dropped out.

    The topic of her dissertation would have been something along the lines of, "Eating Behavior, Decision Making, and Identity".

    It was about how we make decisions around food, how those decisions affect our identity, and how our identity affect our choices.

    And that's a lot like what Elise has done.

    By telling that story and interpreting the information, it’s a cycle in which your decisions impact who you are and who you are impacts what you do.

    Another part of our food stories is that they're not only our own, which allows people to feel more open.

    You set the foundation for your children's food story just like we have inherited a story.

    It's not just about what's on your plate; this impacts your entire life.

    On how to write a food story:

    Every single person has a food story.

    The first part is thinking about what your food story is and pulling out common themes.

    This is when you can think about what is or isn't working for you and what you'd like to rewrite or change.

    Then, you can go back and figure out where that came from, you can figure out what happened.

    And from there, when you can release it, you can start to feel more connected to who you are today.

    The next step is being really honest with yourself about what you want to change and how you want to feel and start to do things.

    "You can't create a new story until you know what you want it to be".

    On how to listen to your body:

    Being in your body physically, like yoga, is a great way to get in touch with yourself.

    Another way to practice listening is to notice all of the messages your body is sending you throughout the day.

    When you start to slow down and pay attention, you'll notice them.

    For example, think about the last time you said yes to something you didn't want to do, and later wished you'd listened to your body.

    But it's also not about beating yourself up, it's just a learning opportunity to reflect on decisions.

    It's not about guilt and shame, it's about whether you can say no when you mean no.

    Quote from Robyn Conley Downs. Replace judgement with curiosity, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes judgement #curiousity

    "Replace judgement with curiosity"

    And the slowing down piece is so important.

    It's about connecting to your body and you can't hear anything or have those honest conversations with yourself when you're stressed and moving rapidly.

    For anyone feeling frantic around food because they feel rushed in life:

    The thing for parents, is that we want to set good examples.

    You don't have to put out a tablecloth and create a whole experience when it comes to meals, but maybe you can just sit down and take a few deep breaths and a few moments to yourself; it's invaluable.

    Not only is it important for you, but you're showing your children that you prioritize your health.

    "You owe it to yourself to take a few deep breaths and nourish your body".

    Chocolate meditation:

    You can use any type of chocolate for this, it's just about paying attention to it.

    It's about bringing all of your senses to the table.

    Go really slowly, close your eyes, sit down.

    Smell this chocolate, think about your first memory with chocolate.

    Finally, bite in really slowly.

    And then stay in your space with that piece of chocolate; don't think about the next one.

    You'll notice how much more satisfying it is when you bring all your senses to the table.

    It's about seeing the difference when you're present, chocolate being an example of that.

    Quote from Elise Museles. Become present in your life, from the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #feelgoodeffectpodcast #podcast #quotes #presence #mindfulness

    "When you're present in one area of your life it also teaches you to become more present in other areas of your life".

    Another way to practice "micro-mindfulness" is Robyn’s 5-Minute Morning.

    Turning a routine into a present experience is so grounding.

    Health and wellness are about so much more than the individual food we put in our mouths, so much more than going to spin or yoga.

    It's about this full picture of wellness.

    On the Environmental Working Group:

    Elise is passionate about the environment and the EWG is a bigger platform that supports the mission, which Elise is a board member for.

    They started more as a lobbying organization, but it's not more consumer-based.

    EWG does a great job of breaking down big ideas so they are more accessible.

    Dirty Dozen & the Clean Fifteen: this annual guide talks about which produce tends to have more pesticides and which ones are generally more safe to eat.

    EWG Verified: in this initiative, the EWG verifies beauty brands who are disclosing all of the ingredients.

    Skin Deep: this is an app (and website) that allows you to scan the barcode of beauty products and find out about the toxicity or safeness of them.

    On what Elise is excited for right now:

    She loves how the conversation is turning to health and feeling good and away from how you look and talk about diets.

    The shift feels gentler and more attainable.

    In her life, Elise is also excited about her podcast, Once Upon a Food Story.

    She's just getting started and she just loves hearing people's stories; stories connect us to one another.

    On what it really means to be healthy:

    "To feel really harmonious in your mind and body and not fight yourself. To have pure acceptance… to be really comfortable with who you are and to come from a loving place when you want to change".

    It’s time to stop stressing about food, and we’re going to tell you exactly how to do that with Elise Museles on the Feel Good Effect Podcast. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #gentle #wellness #healthy

    Guest Bio

    Elise Museles is a Certified Eating Psychology and Nutrition Expert, creator of the Food Story platform and the wildly popular blog Kale & Chocolate. As an author, speaker, health coach, and podcast host, Elise’s mission is to empower women to create a healthier relationship with food and their bodies by changing what’s on their plate – and what’s in their minds.

    Elise recently launched her podcast, Once Upon A Food Story, where she shares the “Food Stories” of leading health experts such as Kimberly Snyder, Dr. Frank Lipman, Robyn Youkilis and more. She’s also the best-selling author of Whole Food Energy: 200 All Natural Recipes to Help You Prepare, Refuel, and Recover.

    Elise’s concept of Food Story was born from her personal struggles with food and body image throughout her life. Going on her first diet at age nine, Elise grew to become obsessed with dieting and calorie counting for many years to follow.

    She worked as a successful attorney with the Department of Justice, but still found herself immersed in dieting and nutrition knowledge. Eventually, Elise realized that the problem wasn’t the food itself; it was her thoughts, feelings, and relationship with her self. After her second son was born, Elise decided to leave her position as an attorney to go to nutrition school and pursue her passion for health and wellness as a career.

    Elise’s background in eating psychology differentiates her from other health experts (see below), as she not only creates beautiful recipes, but gets to the root of unwanted health and eating challenges. Through her unique Food Story Method, she helps clients understand where these thoughts and habits come from, so they can rewrite their personal Food Story, and reconnect back to the wisdom of their own bodies to lead them to make the best (and most delicious!) choices.

    In her down time, Elise enjoys spending time in nature with her two golden retrievers, practicing Vinyasa yoga, or cooking colorful meals for her husband and two sons—all amazing cooks as well! She’s also passionate about getting behind the lens as a food photographer and shares daily inspiration (and mouthwatering photos!) on Facebook and Instagram.  You can connect with Elise on Instagram @kaleandchocolate and on her website elisemuseles.com

    Resources

    Whole Food Energy: 200 All Natural Recipes to Help You Prepare, Refuel, and Recover

    Energy Snack

    www.elisemuseles.com

    Robyn’s 5-Minute Morning

    www.ewg.org

    EWG’s 2019 Dirty Dozen

    EWG’s 2019 Clean Fifteen

    EWG Verified

    Once Upon a Food Story

    Connect with Elise on Instagram @kaleandchocolate

    3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love!

    The Key to Feeding Your Family Healthy Food, with Taesha Butler

    How to Naturally Balance Your Hunger Hormones, with Kelly LeVeque

    How to Thrive with Real Food, with Sarah Adler

    Show the Feel Good Effect Love

    1. Share it via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter.

    2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

    3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

    This post contains affiliate links.

    94 Want to Break Up with Your Phone? Here's How with Catherine Price

    Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

    If you’re ready to break up with your phone, this episode is for you!

    Ready to break up with your phone? Award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentle #wellness #habits #routines #addictions #phones #technology #purpose

    Want to Break Up with Your Phone? Here's How with Catherine Price

    In this conversation with award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, you’ll get a practical and hands-on plan to break up and then make up with your phone.

    Catherine breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. Then, we’ll talk about a plan and a mindset that will enable you to take a break and take control of your life.

    Listen now!

    Shownotes

    Okay, be honest.

    Is your phone the first thing you reach for in the morning and the last thing you touch before bed?

    In this episode, we’re going to give you a practical and hands-on plan to break up and then make up with your phone.

    The goal isn’t to get rid of your phone, it’s to create a long-term relationship that feels good.

    You’re going to discover how phones and apps are designed to be addictive, and how the time we spend on them damages our ability to focus, think deeply, and form new memories.

    And then we’ll talk about a plan for your settings, apps, and environment, and mindset that will enable you to take a break and take control of your life.

    If you’re ready to break up with your phone, this episode is for you!

    We are talking with award-winning journalist, Catherine Price, a science journalist, author, and speaker.

    She helps individuals and organizations establish best practices to support their creativity, productivity, and mental health.

    I invited Catherine on the show so she could break down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, and addictions, and habits because I believe knowledge is power.

    This is not about guilting you or shaming you or saying something is wrong with you if you’re looking at your phone all the time.

    It’s about helping you understand why it’s happening so you can shift your mindset and create new habits.

    Be sure to stay tuned until the end of this episode so you can (finally!) hear about my huge announcement!

    I’m so excited for this episode and I invite you to take action, even if it’s just one thing, and then share it with me on social media (tag me @realfoodwholelife).

    I know it might be counter to the message to jump on social media and share how you’re not being on social media, but I think when you share what’s working, it will inspire other people to listen to this episode and to take some action.

    It’s not about getting rid of the phone or ditching social media, it’s just about finding healthy habits and mindset that helps us do it in a way that feels good.

    On what led Catherine to Write How to Break Up With Your Phone:

    A few things led Catherine to write How to Break Up With Your Phone.

    One, she's a science journalist by training so she likes to try to understand things from a deep level and then write about them.

    And then another thing is that she has a background in mindfulness; she's done training in Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction and written a bunch about it.

    So she tries to be pretty aware of what she's doing and how it's making her feel.

    The thing that really catalyzed this, though, is that she had this moment when she realized her new baby was looking up at her as she was looking down at her phone, and once she actually noticed that, it made her feel sick to her stomach.

    She really didn't want her daughter to think what she was seeing was a human relationship and it was also not the way she wanted to experience motherhood or her own life

    In other words, she didn't want to just be staring down at her phone while life passed her by.

    All those things together led her to want to write a book that would both look into the science of what our phones are doing to us but also provide concrete solutions and ideally solutions that came at the problem from a non-judgemental way, that gave people the ability to adapt the plan based on their own needs and wants.

    Robyn hears from listeners about wanting to change, but feeling guilty every time they do, which isn't what we're looking for either.

    Catherine comes at it from a perspective of not doubling down, when you start to feel bad because you're feeling bad.

    "I understand I'm feeling bad, I'm irritated at myself because I'm not sticking to what I said I wanted to do, but there's no point in dwelling on that, that's already happened. The question is what am I going to do now?"

    Ready to break up with your phone? Award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentle #wellness #habits #routines #addictions #phones #technology #purpose

    On the process on getting into the science:

    When Catherine started this whole process, there wasn't a lot out there directly about phones, there was a lot more about the internet and how it could be changing us and our brains.

    She started by reading everything she could that seemed applicable.

    She searched for “smartphone addictions” in PubMed, she looked into books on habit change and technology, casting a wide net, reading everything she could and calling upon all these interviews she had done in the past around topics like positive psychology and habit change.

    Catherine's book is broken into two parts: the first half is looking at the science about what we know about how our phones are affecting us and how they're designed to get us hooked, and the second half is a plan for what to do about it.

    What Catherine was finding in all of her reading was that many of these books were interesting, but they didn't tell you what you do, so you'd end up feeling depressed and anxious.

    She also wanted to test her hypotheses and plan on other people, so she recruited a bunch of friends and strangers to go through different versions of the breakup so she could see what was working and what people were struggling with.

    What really surprised Catherine was how deeply our phones are really affecting us.

    Part of us knows that there's something serious going on, but we don't give it as much weight as we should.

    The more she's learned, the more she's realized that this is a really big deal, and phones really are affecting us in more ways than many of us imagine.

    Most surprising, is that the time we spend on our phones is literally changing our brains.

    We're spending an average of four hours a day on them, and if you do anything for four hours a day, you're going to get pretty good at it.

    On phone design and addiction:

    Our phones are designed to actually get us to stay on them.

    And in general, willpower is never a good way to change your habits, because you only have so much.

    You really want to figure out a way for the new habit to be something you want to adopt.

    A lot of apps, particularly social media apps, the news, email, dating games, etc. are all making money off of advertising.

    Basically, any time an app is free, you should have warning bells going off in your mind.

    If an app is free, and it's profitable, then we can't possibly be the customers for that app.

    So we're actually the product, and advertisers are the customers and our attention is what is being sold.

    The more time we spend on an app, the more time it has to gather data on us, which it uses to show us targeted ads.

    The way we get hooked is apps manipulate our brains' biochemistry by getting us to release a chemical called dopamine.

    Dopamine is our brains' way of recording when something is worth doing again.

    It helps us do things like remember to eat and reproduce, but it's very easy to create a product that will hijack out dopamine systems by triggering the release of dopamine.

    The dopamine triggers on your phones are very similar to slot machines, something that we know to be very addictive.

    For example, your phone has bright colors, sounds, things that happen in response to something you do, novelty, anticipation (our brains actually release twice as much dopamine in anticipation for a reward than we do when we get the reward), and unpredictability.

    Unpredictability is a big one because we're more likely to keep doing something compulsively if we only sometimes get a positive reward.

    We're training ourselves to associate checking our phone with getting a reward, creating a dopamine loop.

    Our apps and phones are also designed to trigger anxiety if we step away from them.

    We tend to call that FOMO (the fear of missing out), but it's actually a real thing where we're so conditioned to think that checking our phone again and again is important to do and when we can't, we get anxious and start to release stress hormones, including cortisol.

    "These devices are designed and engineered to get us to stay on them for the maximum amount of time".

    When you know how things are working, you have the power to make choices for you, which is the whole point of this conversation.

    This isn't necessarily a bad thing, it's just an awareness thing.

    The way data is collected about us can create ads tailored for us, but it can also lead to social media and news apps only showing information they believe to pertain to us, narrowing what we're exposed to and choosing what our worldview will become.

    On the breakup and habit change:

    First up, breaking up with your phone does not mean dumping your phone.

    The goal is to create a personalized relationship with your phone that feels good to you.

    The first thing you have to do is change how you think about the problem.

    The breakup starts with a technology triage to figure out where you are now and where you want to go.

    The 4-week breakup:

    1 | Figure out how much time you're spending on your phone right now.

    Catherine recommends trying Moment.

    2 | Define what a healthy relationship would look like.

    Keep the useful stuff, and decide what stuff makes you feel bad.

    The goal is to change how you use those apps that make you feel bad.

    This is when you might try to leave your phone out of the bedroom, but you need to have an alternative activity, like reading.

    This habit loop is very well established, and if you have a replacement there, ready for your automatic reach, you don't have to rely on willpower.

    Treat it like an ongoing experiment with yourself, and if you slip-up it's fine.

    3 | Change your brain with attention building exercises.

    Our phone in impacting our ability to concentrate, and it takes time and practice to get that back.

    4 | Trial separation: take a full 24-hour break from your phone.

    This just gives you some perspective about what it's like to be without your phone.

    For many people, it starts off anxious, but by the second day they feel like time has slowed down and a strange sense of calm, which seems to be pretty universal.

    5 | Solidify these habits that you've experimented with.

    Identify what worked for you, what you want to keep, what didn't work for you.

    This is your life, your relationship.

    This is a chance to reflect and create tools to support these habits moving forward.

    This 30-day break up is a huge accomplishment, but it's really an ongoing challenge because you're trying to sustain a healthy relationship with a device that's designed to not have a healthy relationship.

    Ready to break up with your phone? Award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentle #wellness #habits #routines #addictions #phones #technology #purpose

    You need to be forgiving of yourself and recognize that if you're aiming for perfection you're guaranteed to fail.

    Gentle is the new perfect.

    Every Friday, Catherine does a "tech check" to assess where she has slipped, where she is right now, and how she can reset.

    She likes having her phone in black and white and she liked having Safari off of her phone, but sometimes she'll have to put those things back in order to check email, and she may forget to undo it.

    So she likes to use Friday mornings to reset, to get back to her baseline of where she wants it to be, and look at the days ahead to get a proactive sense of what she would like to do or accomplish.

    On how this applies to all of us:

    A lot of people in a traditional job may not feel like they have the flexibility to do this, or, if they're an entrepreneur they feel like they need to be on Instagram because that's how they promote their business.

    But it's not all or nothing.

    You have to figure out where the line in between what you truly have to do and what you're telling yourself you have to do, and then when you run into work-related "excuses" for what's actually a deep-seated habit, it's like looking for a coverup.

    For Catherine, this is her email.

    She tells herself that checking email is productivity.

    Certainly, to a degree she needs to check her email, but the times when she's not, when she steps away, are far more productive.

    We need to think more critically: what is the actual purpose that you need to do this thing?

    Does the frequency with which you do that activity actually match up to your requirements?

    Maybe you are more limited in what you can do, but in most cases, we haven't pushed up against that limit yet.

    We all could be experimenting with trying to change those habits and see if you can still fulfill those obligations (or even do a better job of fulfilling those obligations by taking a step back and creating some better boundaries).

    When you're on particular apps that trigger these distractions, what are you doing while you're on that app, and what are you telling yourself?

    Ask yourself if that's really true.

    If you're telling yourself you're on social media to connect with family, is that what's actually happening.

    What reward are you actually after?

    Is that feeling productive, not feeling lonely, not feeling so anxious?

    What would potentially would be another, possibly more fulfilling way to achieve that result?

    On tips for parents creating healthy relationships with devices?

    This isn't to make any parent feel guilty!

    But it's so important to figure out our own relationship with our phones.

    What behaviors are we modeling?

    Something Catherine suggests is letting your children get involved with your relationship.

    Ask them about the way you use your phone and the way grown-ups use their phones in general, how does it make them feel when they see you on it?

    Catherine has a friend who wrote The Art of Screen Time, who compares phones and kids to cars.

    Eventually, your kid if going to drive, but you wouldn't have your keys to your 7-year-old and send them out to the highway.

    Tip: one idea for modeling a healthy device relationship is to have a charging station where all of the phones have to "sleep" for the night.

    You can check your phone after it "goes to sleep", but you have to go to it, it can't come with you.

    Make it a fun competition with a family-centered penalty.

    On what Catherine is working on right now:

    Catherine's book has been out for a year now and she's so excited about how much interest there has been.

    Secondly, she just started something called Screen/Life Balance.

    It's going to morph into a whole collection of resources and online courses that people can use to work on specific aspects of their screen-life balance.

    The book also has a website, at phonebreakup.com with lock screens and resources to support this habit and a phone breakup challenge.

    She's excited to have these online solutions that go beyond the book.

    On what it really means to be healthy:

    “To be kind to yourself and to have the goal of making sure when you spend your attention on something, it's because you actually want to be doing so… Remember real life, put down your phone, put away your screens once in a while if not most of the while. And actually try to engage with real things and people that bring you joy".

    Ready to break up with your phone? Award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentle #wellness #habits #routines #addictions #phones #technology #purpose

    On my big announcement:

    I’m so excited to finally share this with you!

    I am bursting at the seams excited to tell you that I have signed a book deal with Penguin Random House, 10 Speed Press .

    We’ve had some amazing 10 Speed Press authors on the show, including Catherine, and they make beautifully designed, information-packed books and I could not be more humbled and honored to have this opportunity.

    I want to talk more about the process, how it came to be, what it’s like to write a book, and all the other things with you, and I’d love to do some special podcast episodes along the way and also invite you to be part of the launch team as that becomes a possibility and other really fun things related to this book.

    The first place to go if you want to know anything going on with the book, opportunities to be involved with the launch, all of those things are right here, where you can be one of the first people to now what’s happening next.

    I can’t spill too many details yet, but it is going to be a cook that goes so beautifully with this podcast, so if you love the podcast you’re going to love the book.

    The basic bottom line of what the book is about is: mindset and habits for health and happiness.

    I could go on about what this means to me and what I think it means about this movement and this community and how we’re changing the conversation about what it really means to be healthy.

    Most of all, I want to thank you for being part of this, because without you there’s no book, no mission, and no message.

    Ready to break up with your phone? Award-winning science journalist, Catherine Price, breaks down the science of what’s really going on in our brains when it comes to phones, addictions, and habits. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentle #wellness #habits #routines #addictions #phones #technology #purpose

    Guest Bio

    Catherine Price is an award-winning journalist, speaker and consultant whose work has appeared in publications including The Best American Science WritingThe New York Times, Popular Science, O, The Oprah Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Washington Post Magazine, Parade, Salon, Slate, Men’s Journal, Self, Medium, Health Magazine, and Outside, among others. 

    Her latest book, How to Break Up With Your Phone (Ten Speed Press, 2018) is devoted to helping people create healthier relationships with their digital devices. It's being published in 26 countries and translated into 18 languages and has received attention from major media outlets around the world. Before that, she wrote VITAMANIA: How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food (Penguin Press, 2015).

    Catherine leads frequent talks and workshops to help people improve their relationships with their devices, and is also the founder of Screen/Life Balance, a movement dedicated to helping people scroll less and live more.

    She's occasionally on Twitter at @catherine_price and on Instagram at @_CatherinePrice and @ScreenLifeBalance. #phonebreakup #screenlifebalance

    Resources

    How to Break Up With Your Phone

    phonebreakup.com

    catherine-price.com

    Screen/Life Balance

    Moment app

    The Art of Screen Time

    Social Media (used sparingly!): 

    Twitter: @catherine_price 

    Instagram: @_CatherinePrice and @ScreenLifeBalance

    #phonebreakup #screenlifebalance

    3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love!

    The Secret to Consistency with Wellness

    5 Things to Do So You Can Actually Take a Break

    How to Create a Morning Routine in Less Time with More Impact

    Show the Feel Good Effect Love

    1. Share it via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter.

    2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

    3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

    93 Transforming How You Eat & Simplifying Grocery Shopping with Jessica Jones

    Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

    Today we’re getting back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping with, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy.

    Get back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping with, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentlewellness #simplify #simpled #living #grocerylist #healthyeating #balance #wellness

    Transforming How You Eat & Simplifying Grocery Shopping with Jessica Jones

    Jessica is a nationally recognized dietician and diabetes educator with a passion for helping people transform the way they eat and make peace with food. She is the coauthor of The 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot and a Diabetes Guide to Enjoying Foods of the World and co-hosts to food heaven podcast.

    Listen now!

    Shownotes

    We’re going back to basics on healthy eating and the secret to simplifying healthy grocery shopping with today’s guest, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy.

    Jessica is a nationally recognized dietician and diabetes educator with a passion for helping people transform the way they eat and make peace with food.

    She is the coauthor of The 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot and a Diabetes Guide to Enjoying Foods of the World.

    She is the cofounder of the healthy living website, Food Heaven Made Easy, where she and provides evidence-based nutrition tips and tricks for living a nutritious life.

    She also cohosts the Food Heaven podcast and she has a grounded approach that you’ll love.

    Today we’re getting back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping

    Jessica is her own individual person, but often times there's a second person who joins her for these interviews.

    She co-runs Food Heaven Made Easy with her BFF Wendy Lopez.

    Both Jess and Wendy are registered dietitians who try to help people eat healthier in a way that is sustainable, practical, evidence based, exciting, culturally relevant, and all the things.

    Together, they run the podcast, do a bunch of recipe development, and work with a bunch of brands that they believe in.

    Really, they just want to help people live their best life.

    On how Jess and Wendy ended up in business together:

    Jess tries to find business owners in the wellness space made up of two people and it's rare to see.

    But it's so cool to have that other person to lean on.

    It's helpful to have someone else there to pick up the slack, have your back as a friend and in a business sense.

    When they first started in 2011, they were just messing around with a creative outlet, it didn't become an official business until around 2015.

    At that time, both Jess and Wendy were both dietetic students looking for that creative outlet where they could talk about nutrition in a way they felt was fun and exciting, trying to show people how to eat healthier versus just giving people boring statements about what to do.

    And they do an amazing job with that.

    It's one thing to say "eat more veggies", but if it were that simple everyone would do it.

    It's really important to take that next step and say how, which Jess and Wendy do such a nice job of.

    On what brought Jess to the field of dietetics:

    Jess was originally a journalist, which has worked out really well.

    Journalism was her first passion and she still loves writing and having a voice that is reflected on paper (or online).

    So she was a journalist working at a magazine, and it was around 2007 when blogs were just starting.

    She remembers working her job full-time being really hard for her because she felt like she was so passionate about writing, but she wasn't always able to write in her voice or write the stories she wanted to.

    She would get anxiety walking into the building itself because you can't get anything wrong, it has to be exactly a certain way; it didn't seem like something she could do forever.

    The other thing was that working as a journalist was pretty low pay.

    It just wasn't a livable wage.

    She wanted to find a job that paid a little more and where she felt like she was directly helping people, kind of on a one on one basis.

    And even though in the past she didn't feel like science was necessarily her thing, she realized later that it really was.

    As a woman of color, she didn't have any confidence in that and nutrition is so science-based so once she started to learn more about what it was all about, it was really exciting for her.

    On one hand it's the nerdy side, and on the other hand there's space to be creative, and also help people in a more sustainable career path.

    On the tension within the dietitian community:

    As a field, it's not like everyone agrees on the same thing.

    And if you are a Registered Dietitian, or someone interested in going into the field, there are a number of ways you could be employed-- you could work for hospitals, for the county, with individual clients.

    There are a lot of opportunities, and yet, there's a lot of tension among the RD community about what they're teaching or what they recommend to their clients.

    The way Jess thinks about it is like recipes.

    Let's say that there are a million different people out there who are making recipes, whether it be chefs, recipe developers, or bloggers, but Jess has her own unique taste buds and style, and she knows what she likes.

    So when she's looking for somebody who is making recipes, she finds people who she's established that they're on the same page in terms of what their flavor profile is.

    Everything is so subjective and then she can trust that if that person comes out with something she'll probably like it.

    It's the same thing for healthcare and dietitians.

    Yes, there are different dietitians who have different messages.

    So, find someone where you feel like your core values match their delivery and approach to health, wellness, and nutrition.

    This is a place that people find themselves in a lot in wellness, searching for the right answer, the right diet, the right exercise plan.

    And as we're searching a seeking, there's conflicting information.

    And it can start to feel like nothing you're doing is right, but if you keep searching, you'll eventually find the right answer, the right person.

    Getting stuck in this spiral of anxiety and seeking can have the opposite effect in wellness.

    There definitely are people who are talking about food, nutrition, and wellness in more of a science base, but even within that, there's always going to be conflict, which is okay.

    Jess doesn't think that there is one right thing, she thinks everything is so individualized.

    "I don't think there's one right diet, I think there's a right diet for you".

    Get back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping with, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentlewellness #simplify #simpled #living #grocerylist #healthyeating #balance #wellness

    It takes some time to figure out what it is that does work best for you.

    But in general, a good dietitian is going to be focused on the science as well as the practicality of all of those different things.

    It’s important to make recommendations that take into account that people are busy or that there's more to food than nutrition, there's a cultural aspect.

    For example, Jess is currently working with a patient who talked about his relationship with boba tea and how in his community, that is something that friends socialize over.

    But then it might become something that starts happening every day of the week and, of course, boba tea can be a little high in sugar.

    So a good dietitian isn't going to tell him that he shouldn't drink boba tea, they will ask him what's important to him and how do we work around maintaining a culture and keeping memories as well as prioritizing health and make them work together.

    Jess really uses the USDA MyPlate guide as a base for most people, and that basically says to make 1/2 of your plates non-starchy vegetables, 1/4 proteins, 1/4 whole grains, and she always mentions to add healthy fats.

    It's a good baseline, but it's not everything.

    She always tells people that we want to balance out nourishing foods with fun foods, because at the end of the day, we aren't just eating for nutrition.

    Keri Glassman, from Nutritious Life, was recently a guest on Jess’s podcast.

    During their conversation, Keri said something wonderful:

    "You don't have to jump on every bandwagon to be healthy". -Keri Glassman

    Get back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping with, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentlewellness #simplify #simpled #living #grocerylist #healthyeating #balance #wellness

    Ultimately, there's an idea of what a healthy plate looks like, but it can be customized to someone's preferences.

    The beauty of having all these options out there is that you can find people who speak your language, address your values, and lift you up.

    Tip: try Jess's social media scrub.

    Look at your social media accounts, and unfollow everyone that's ever made you feel bad about yourself.

    Follow people who are inclusive in wellness, offering different perspectives.

    Check out Jess’s list of who to follow!

    It's not exhaustive, but it's a great place to start.

    On grocery shopping:

    Jess and Wendy have an amazing resource, a Healthy Eating Starter Kit, which you can grab for free by signing up for their email list at www.foodheavenmadeeasy.com.

    It goes through how to set goals and find your motivation.

    It's evidence-based, so it's not just stuff they're making up, it's research-backed.

    It's also packaged with a grocery list and a supermarket survival guide, which they give out for free to anyone who signs up for their list.

    More on the grocery list:

    If we're cooking at all, we're spending time in the grocery store.

    And a major habit of most people is just to wander around, grab stuff, put it in their cart, and then come home and put it in the pantry and fridge, and then they wonder why it's so hard to cook.

    But there's a way to simplify this and make grocery shopping easier.

    Jess's recommendations to simplify:

    1 | Be consistent with grocery shopping + figure out the frequency that works for you.

    Sometimes Jess goes grocery shopping once a week, but recently she's been doing once a month.

    With once a month, she'll do a Costco run, where she gets everything for the month (even perishables that can last a month in the fridge).

    And then on a weekly basis, Jess has a farm-share box that gets delivered to her house, which she gets to customize for $33 a week with a ton of fruits and vegetables that are delivered every Thursday evening.

    She also is a fan of going out once a week to Trader Joe's or a local grocery store, and just figuring out how much you need to buy to last you for one week.

    So number one, is figuring out the frequency that you have in your schedule to go and building from there.

    And then when you know a good day and time, put that in your calendar.

    The thing that makes it overwhelming is not having a system at all, and it feels more challenging than it has to be.

    2 | Bring a list + map out the store.

    It's really hard to stay on a budget without a list.

    Jess uses a spreadsheet that she puts loose meal plans, staples that she knows she needs into and she tries to categorize it by where those foods will be in the supermarket.

    It helps you not forget anything.

    Tip for a budget: keep your calculator out on your phone and add the price every time something goes in your cart-- once you hit your budget, something has to go or it's a good place to stop.

    If you're not a spreadsheet person, use a pen and paper.

    Organizing your list by type of food and place in the store streamlines your life.

    Robyn likes to do this with her daughter, too, teaching her about budgeting and having those conversations about "do I really need this or can I swap it for this?".

    And after doing this for a few months, you really won't need a calculator anymore, you kind of just know how it goes.

    If this sounds totally overwhelming, just think about what the least you could do now is, and even if it's just going to the grocery store or signing up for the CSA box that's going to make your life easier, just take that one step.

    (for more on CSA’s and eating fresh, check out this conversation with Andrea Bemis)

    If a spreadsheet is going to stop you from doing anything at all, just write the list out, just do something to get your momentum going.

    The nice thing about a spreadsheet, though, is that next month, you're probably not going to change your list a whole lot.

    It is a little more work up front, but then it gets so much easier.

    3 | Color your cart + check out the nutrition facts.

    We don't want to get stuck in a rut of always having the same things, especially with fruits and vegetables.

    We can think of getting a variety of fruits and vegetables in terms of colors, because all of the colors represent different vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals.

    Think about making things practical, though.

    There's the recommendation and then there's real life.

    For real life, a goal could be adding in three different colors of fruits and vegetables in a week.

    If you eat seasonally, it's really easy to do this because it's always changing.

    (Eating seasonally also means better tasting, more nutritious, and cheaper!)

    An easy way to do that is to look up what's in season in your area, and that will help you naturally color your cart.

    Once you have a variety in that way, look at the nutrition facts label.

    A lot of times, we might see a change in packaging that looks more natural and it's a tan color or white and simple or rustic, but reading the label can reveal that it's the same as it was before.

    "Natural, fresh, and healthy. Those aren't regulated terms, they don't mean anything in the world of nutrition. Reading the nutrition facts label can be really helpful”.

    An easy way to do this is to think about what's going on for you, health-wise.

    For example, if you're a vegetarian or a vegan and you know that you're having a hard time getting enough protein, the label can be really helpful for seeking out higher proteins by comparing products.

    Some soy milks might have 11 grams of protein while others might have 8 grams.

    Or with other plant-based milks, some might be sweetened, some might not be.

    It's about what's going on for you-- Are you trying to watch your added sugar? Does it taste any different for you either way?

    Also, as many of us know, fiber is really healthy and important, it helps to keep us regular, lower cholesterol, it helps shrink our GI tract, so having foods with fiber are great.

    And a lot of the healthiest foods don't have labels, but if you're looking at two cereals, for example, you might choose the one that's lower in sugar and higher in fiber and protein.

    And then with vitamins, we want to make sure that we're getting in vitamin D, which a lot of people have trouble with.

    Same thing with calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E-- check out the labels to see what you're getting from your food.

    It's not to drive yourself crazy, but just to get in the habit of checking to see what's going on and maybe compare two things to see what you might want more of versus what you might want in moderation.

    Reading labels can take a little time at the beginning, but you're actually learning from it and eventually you just know what's in the food you're buying.

    Grocery shopping is something that we do all the time, but with a little thought, a little intentionality, you can level-up the whole thing and make it easier, simpler, and have a better quality basket when you leave the store.

    On what's lighting up Jess right now:

    Jessica got married last summer and she and her husband are getting ready for their official honeymoon, a three and a half week trip to Europe that she's really excited about.

    And then professionally, she's excited about honing in on just a couple of different things.

    For now, they're really focusing on their podcast, partnerships, and just having one program.

    They just came out with a “Best-Of” Program, which has all of their different programs packaged together.

    She's excited and grateful for being able to be in the nutrition space and feel like she can be creative with some of the work she does.

    She also loves conversations like this, hopefully giving people ideas for how to make healthy and wellness easier for them.

    On what it really means to be healthy:

    Rebecca Schritchfield wrote a book called Body Kindness that Jess loves and always recommends.

    Rebecca recommends that people create a body kindness blueprint.

    "Taking the time to really truly think about what does health mean for you... I think if everyone took the time to decide what that really looked like for them, not what they think they should do, but truly when do you feel your happiest, when do you feel your mot energetic, when do you feel like you're living your best life, and write that down and just try to remind yourself why you're doing it and that it really does make you feel better and make a difference".

    Get back to basics on healthy eating and breaking down how to simplify healthy grocery shopping with, Jessica Jones, from Food Heaven Made Easy. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #gentlewellness #simplify #simpled #living #grocerylist #healthyeating #balance #wellness

    Guest Bio

    Jessica is a nationally recognized Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator with a passion for helping people transform the way they eat and make peace with food. She is the co-author the 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot and A Diabetes Guide to Enjoying the Foods of the World. As the co-founder of the healthy living website, Food Heaven Made Easy, Jessica provides evidenced-based nutrition tips and tricks for living a nutritious life. When she is not counseling patients on nutrition therapy for wellness, disordered eating, GI issues and chronic disease management, Jessica co-hosts the Food Heaven Podcast, which was named New & Noteworthy by iTunes. Through Food Heaven Made Easy, Jessica regularly partners with national brands like Quaker Oats, Sunsweet, The Almond Board of California, Mighties Kiwi and the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council to create delicious recipes and curated multimedia content. In additional to being a go-to nutrition expert for many national media outlets, Jessica has penned countless articles about food, health and nutrition for publications like SELF.com, Buzzfeed, and Today's Dietitian.

    Resources

    The 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot

    www.foodheavenmadeeasy.com

    Food Heaven podcast

    USDA’s MyPlate

    The Nutrition Entrepreneur w/ Keri Glassman

    Eating Local, CSA’s and Farm to Table, with Andrea Bemis

    “Best Of” Food Heaven Program

    Body Kindness

    Connect with Jess + Wendy on Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

    3 More Feel Good Effect Episodes You’ll Love

    No Fail Meal Planning Tips (For People Who Hate Meal Planning)

    How to Get Unstuck & Simplify, with Ashley Gartland

    How to Stop Overthinking Meals

    Show the Feel Good Effect Love

    1. Share it via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, or Twitter.

    2. Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts. Your ratings and reviews help more people find the show!

    3. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts.

    This post contains affiliate links.

    92 Simplifying Mindful Wellness with Jules Hunt

    Feel Good Effect PodcastPaige ReohrComment

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City, and the first truly conscious food finder app, Trubelly.

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #gentlewellness #ominthecity #simplify #mindful #purpose #productivity #goals #success

    Simplifying Mindful Wellness with Jules Hunt

    Jules uses her platform to bring holistic wellness down to earth and empower women to simplify their life to really thrive. She shares actionable insight on everyday wellness, sustainability, and nontoxic living with some purposeful productivity hacks.

    Listen now!

    Shownotes

    Today we’re going to talk about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from Om and the City.

    Jules is the creator of the mindful lifestyle brand, Om and the City, and the founder and CEO of Trubelly, the first truly conscious food finder app.

    Jules uses her platform to bring holistic wellness down to earth and empower women to simplify their life to really thrive.

    She shares actionable insight on everyday wellness, sustainability, and nontoxic living and purposeful productivity hacks, which is exactly what we’re talking about today.

    Before we get to the interview, I want to let you know about our free Simplified Wellness Starter Guide that you’ll definitely want to grab.

    It’s free, downloadable, printable, and it really gives you a step by step to get started with gentle wellness, incremental, intentional steps to take to simplify movement, meals, and mind and really feel good.

    Jules has been a long time listener to the Feel Good effect podcast, so it's really awesome to have her on the show.

    On how Jules's childhood affected where she is today:

    Jules was very free spirited and sensitive as a kid.

    Being empathetic was a big part of who she was a child, very aware of the feelings of the people around her, which is how she was able to connect with people early on.

    But there are some cons to being a sensitive child, too.

    Moving to New York definitely helped Jules thicken her skin and start to cultivate stronger business, work, and personal skills that she needed.

    Jules' family was always pretty healthy, her mom was always very conscious about ingredients and they always tried to eat really fresh foods and cook everything at home.

    And even though she was even drinking matcha from a young age, they still would eat out or have McDonald's and indulge sometimes.

    But overall, Jules' mom prioritized wellness in their family growing up, which really impacted Jules as an adult.

    On moving to NY and starting a wellness blog:

    Jules majored in fashion design and merchandising so moving to New York was always the plan.

    She's originally from Kentucky, so she was looking for a drastic difference with more energy and excitement.

    She was able to secure a job after college with the same company she did an internship with a few summers prior, so it all worked out.

    And since she was ready for this move for some time, there wasn't a lot of shock from the city life.

    You might feel like there are so many people when you move to a big city, but it can actually be very isolating and even though she was there living with some of her best friends, Jules still felt lonely at times.

    She was also in a toxic work environment, and when she got out of it she couldn't believe some of the things that had happened.

    But it all led her to where she's at now: if she hadn't worked there she wouldn't have been seeking an outlet, which was her blog.

    Jules started her wellness blog while working in fashion and she's so grateful for it.

    In retrospect, it's an obvious thing to think "I want an outlet, so I'll start a blog", but it wasn't as common when Jules started hers.

    She had a few different blogs over her lifetime, since writing was always a way to express herself.

    But when she decided to start her wellness blog, it just felt different.

    It felt like something that she really needed at that point in her life and she knew she was onto something.

    It was something she decided to start to express how she was feeling and to document her clean beauty journey after healing her cystic acne with coconut oil among other things she was learning and exploring.

    She was working through some mental health struggles that she had in college, too, and she realized that yoga and nontoxic living was something that she was really passionate about and she wanted to have a place to document and share it.

    For the first couple of years with her blog, Jules wasn't active on social media, terrified of promoting herself and not wanting anyone to judge her.

    It took some time, and she was purely writing on the blog building up web content.

    Then, she ended up quitting her job in fashion and going to Nicaragua for a month for her yoga teacher training and it was at that point she realized how much her blog meant to her.

    There was a time when she wanted to delete it, feeling like no one was listening or reading besides her friends and family, and it was discouraging not getting that feedback.

    But while she was in Nicaragua, she had this chance to disconnect and tap into what she was passionate about.

    When she returned to New York, she decided she needed to first get a job, because at that point she wasn't making money from her blog and didn't even realize that was a possibility.

    And she kept on blogging, kept sharing what she was passionate about.

    She started becoming more active on social media and her fiance also gave her the confidence to take photos that had her face in them and to start to share more of her life online.

    As she was consistent with her posting, her platform started to grow, she started to get feedback from people she didn't know, and she was hearing about how her writing was positively impacting people.

    It gave her the fuel to keep going.

    On pressures for wellness perfection:

    Jules was doing an instagram story about making a matcha with oat milk not too long ago.

    It was a short, harmless video, during which Jules disclosed that, while she usually makes her own oat milk, she had bought it this time.

    Shortly after, she received a message from somebody commenting on the canola oil in the oat milk that she was using.

    She didn't feel the need to have a disclaimer on her own story, since it was a very innocent video, but low and behold someone wrote her message that was not positive, judging her for using oat milk that contains canola oil.

    It was one of the few messages she received that week, just nitpicking at her.

    "The more your audience grows, the more you feel like someone's waiting for you to mess up".

    Jules has never claimed to be perfect or immaculate with her wellness, and she does a great job of telling people that.

    So when she gets these nitpicky messages about what she's eating, it really bothers her.

    And this is a bigger issue that as a wellness community, we should be more aware of and start talking about more.

    It's not about the canola oil in the oat milk (you might not even see a problem with that example at all).

    But this is what happens on a daily basis for those who have wellness platforms who are showing up and sharing content.

    On a daily basis, no matter what she does, somebody (or many people) send Robyn messages about why what she's doing isn't right.

    And not about moral or ethical issues, it’s about nitpicky, little, tiny things like Jules' oat milk.

    No matter what she posts, there's a message about how she's not doing it right.

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #gentlewellness #ominthecity #simplify #mindful #purpose #productivity #goals #success

    "Wellness is not about getting it right all the time".

    By indulging in that little nitpicking, we are creating this sense that there is a perfect version, and that if you just try hard enough you can get it all right.

    When people are waiting for you to fail, rather than celebrating actually trying to make positive change, you're setting up a society where people aren't going to want to share anymore.

    We want to celebrate and lift people up who are trying to share bits of their life.

    On perfection chasing:

    Jules has a history of an eating disorder, and if she was to start thinking of food as "good" or "bad" or "off limits" or all these negative words, it will send her down a negative spiral.

    So, to her, it's about celebrating when she's doing things that fuel her body as well as celebrating when she wants to celebrate.

    "It's not just about the ingredients. Being healthy is also about your mental well-being and are you allowing yourself to live, are you allowing yourself to explore, have fun, eat birthday cake?"

    If you're constantly telling yourself "you can't have this", it's unsustainable.

    It's not the path to healthiness.

    Robyn hears from listeners, too, who are feeling paralyzed by wellness.

    People reach out to her saying that no matter what they do, they feel like they aren't getting wellness right.

    There's still a "good-food-bad-food" mentality.

    And all this pressure to get it right makes them not start at all, or start and then stop.

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #gentlewellness #ominthecity #simplify #mindful #purpose #productivity #goals #success

    "Start somewhere, start simply, and really break it down to how you feel".

    If the best thing you can do is wake up in the morning and ask yourself what you need, that's a step in the direction of living a more mindful lifestyle; there's no rulebook, no checklist.

    There's no perfect path to wellness. It's completely personal.

    We just need to give ourselves permission to do it our own way.

    Permission to do wellness your own way. Permission to make mistakes. Permission to eat things that sometimes aren't the best for you. Permission to skip some workouts.

    There's no gold star for doing it perfectly.

    Everything counts and the little missteps or splurges are totally part of being human.

    On simplifying:

    It all started with a simple closet clean out over a year and a half ago that transformed into something so much more impactful than physical decluttering.

    Since she started becoming more aware of what she was mentally, physically, and emotionally bringing into her life, Jules has started to transform her mindset and it's helped her become more purposefully productive with her time.

    She stopped being a slave to day to day time-sucking tasks, she started to learn how to better manage her business, and it became less wasteful and more thoughtful.

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #gentlewellness #ominthecity #simplify #mindful #purpose #productivity #goals #success

    "The deeper I go into simplifying, the more I realize that less truly, truly is more and the less stuff I have, the more space I have to breathe, think, move, create".

    Jules calls herself an "aspiring minimalist", not wanting to live in a home without art or things that make her happy.

    She likes the values of minimalism, though.

    Applying those values to her life in her own way is her version of being a minimalist.

    Minimalism itself has really expanded to include more people and more approaches.

    We did a decluttering series on the Feel Good Effect with Gretchen Rubin talking about how to do it from the perspective of your personality with no one right way, and Allie Casazza who talked about minimalism and simplifying motherhood when there's only so much you can do with other people bringing things into your house.

    And just like wellness, everyone has their own definition of how much stuff we can handle, whether it's material items or calendar events.

    On simplifying your workflow:

    Jules is someone who is balancing a lot of things: she's running her business, constantly making brand deals, posting on social media, running her website, planning a wedding, and closing on a house.

    When it comes to managing her workflow, Jules talks a lot about simplifying as a constant practice; it's consistently choosing to declutter her calendar and not take on certain work, constantly choosing how to prioritize her day.

    Not every day is perfect, but because of her strong values and habits around prioritizing her time, she's able to react in an effective way.

    She leaves her personal life open, but when it comes to work she likes to run her business like a CEO, rather than reacting to things all day.

    Notifications are a big time sucker by taking you out of your focus.

    By simply turning off your notifications, you're able to reclaim your time and choose how to spend that time.

    Task-batching and categorizing

    These have been game changing for Jules.

    For example, she may make Mondays and Wednesdays her administrative days, checking emails or taking meetings, really where she does all of her left brain things.

    And then on Tuesdays and Thursdays it's writing, content creation, photography, all the creative things.

    Categorizing her work days really helps her stay focused and avoid letting notifications getting her off track.

    Even for people who have to be present on their email every day, and maybe can't only answer messages twice a week, blocking out 30 minutes to an hour during the day will really help with productivity.

    "Once I overcame the self-imposed idea that everyone needed a same-day response from me I was liberated. I was liberated from the chains of my inbox".

    It's an incremental approach, it's not all or nothing.

    If only checking your email a couple times a week seems completely unrealistic, you can ease into it.

    And it's also about getting through that discomfort and realizing that it is, for the most part, self-imposed, that most of the time (depending on the work that you're in) most people don't need an immediate response.

    Managing social media

    Showing up online is part of Jules' business.

    She wrote an article on how she mindfully approaches social media, and the first thing is that she takes her business very seriously so she knows that it doesn't solely rely on Instagram.

    Yes, it can be important to maintain that presence, but it's not a crutch to be on your phone all day because there are better, more productive things you can be doing for long term success.

    1 | Don't treat social media like an all you can eat buffet.

    When you constantly have notifications that you're checking, the next thing you know you're sucked in and 30-minutes have passed.

    To be more productive with social media Jules typically posts in the morning, stays on for about 20-minutes to answer as many messages as she can and respond to comments, but then once that period has passed she puts her phone on do not disturb, puts it in her drawer, and she gets to work.

    It's helped her to have that time in the morning to check in and then not touch it again until her lunch break.

    When you're working from home, people might find it hard to stick to that structure, but Jules has learned that structure is her best friend, helping her stay grounded and stay on task.

    2 | Capture it, save it, and post it later.

    If Jules is going to capture a moment, she captures it, saves it, and posts it later.

    Sharing on Instagram stories is a fun way to connect with her community, but Jules also wants to live her life and enjoy whatever she's experiencing.

    And again, it's not all or nothing.

    She's still present on social media, but it's not taking over every second of her life, nor is it taking her out of the moments that she really wants to be present in.

    And Jules used to be an all or nothing person, but it's about taking baby steps and being consistent with your boundaries and actively trying to pursue them rather than cutting yourself off completely.

    It's catching yourself, checking yourself, and then recognizing it and trying to do better tomorrow.

    And the other thing: she engages with people on social media.

    When people tell Robyn that they hate being on social media, she asks them if they've actually typed words into the app recently, or if they're just scrolling.

    If you're just scrolling, it's really passive and it's easy to forget that there are other people who want to connect, too.

    It changes the experience of being of the app when you're actively engaging while you're there, versus passively scrolling.

    Social media isn't inherently bad, it's just how you choose to use the app.

    And unfollow people who don't make you feel good.

    It's up to you to unfollow them, you can't dictate what other people are doing.

    On what's going on with Jules right now:

    Jules has a guidebook called Simplify and Thrive-- 40 pages of tips and tricks to declutter your life.

    It's a compilation of everything she's learned through her own decluttering process.

    She covers the mental, physical, and emotional aspects, while also talking about simplifying your time, your relationships, and where you're spending your energy (not just about decluttering and organizing your closet).

    It's one of her favorite things that she's created and it's really her in a nutshell.

    Jules has also gotten into business coaching, starting The Mindful Entrepreneur mentorship program after getting so many questions from other aspiring entrepreneurs who wanted to learn how to build their businesses mindfully.

    She created this program as a way to share knowledge and guide her community about strategic band growth.

    It's meant for people who are visionaries, great at coming up with ideas, but need help getting unstuck and getting started.

    There's a waitlist that you can apply for here.

    Right now, Jules is excited to, one, close on her house and move in, two, eventually have brain space to plan her wedding and, three, for her and her fiance Andrew's app.

    Andrew is a mobile app designer and one of their best friends is a developer so the three of them teamed up and created a start up, called Trubelly, the first truly conscious food finder.

    Trubelly is basically all about helping mindful eaters discover high quality, conscious, and transparent restaurants in town, even accounting for food allergies and special diets.

    Find out more and get on the waitlist here!

    On what it really means to be healthy:

    "To be healthy is completely personal, it's intuitive, it's something that you innately feel within you and there's no rule book, no right or wrong way to do it, it's just about how are you feeling in your body".

    This is all about how to simplify mindful wellness with Jules Hunt from mindful lifestyle brand, Om & the City. #realfoodwholelife #feelgoodeffect #podcast #wellness #gentlewellness #ominthecity #simplify #mindful #purpose #productivity #goals #success

    Guest Bio

    Jules Hunt is the creator of the mindful lifestyle brand Om & The City and Founder/CEO of Trubelly, the first truly conscious food finder app. Jules uses her platform to bring holistic wellness down-to-earth and empower women to simplify their life to really thrive. She shares actionable insight on everyday wellness, sustainability + non-toxic living tips, and purposeful productivity habits for your most vibrant life. Jules was recently named Wanderlust's '35 Under 35 in Wellness' and has been featured on Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global, The Daily Mail, Well+Good, PopSugar and more. Beyond the blog, Jules is a certified yoga & mindfulness teacher, crazy plant lady, and proud dog mama.

    Resources

    Inner Order, Outer Calm, & Decluttering, with Gretchen Rubin

    How to Declutter Everything, with Allie Casazza

    How I Mindfully Approach Social Media

    Blog: omandthecityblog.com

    Instagram: @omandthecity

    YouTube: youtube.com/omandthecity

    Guidebook: Simplify & Thrive

    Mentorship Program: The Mindful Entrepreneur

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